Brain-Computer Interface and Its Uses

Brain-Computer Interface and Its Uses

Ever wanted to control your computer with your mind? In the world of neuroscience, this is already possible.

A brain-computer interface (BCI) or a brain-machine interface (BMI), is “defined as a system that measures and analyzes brain signals and converts them in real-time into outputs that do not depend on the normal output pathways of peripheral nerves and muscles”.

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Brain-Computer Interface and Its Uses

Brain-Computer Interface and Its Uses

Ever wanted to control your computer with your mind? In the world of neuroscience, this is already possible.

A brain-computer interface (BCI) or a brain-machine interface (BMI), is “defined as a system that measures and analyzes brain signals and converts them in real-time into outputs that do not depend on the normal output pathways of peripheral nerves and muscles”.

read more
Biomarkers, how they influence the understanding of health conditions, and Alzheimer’s biomarkers

Biomarkers, how they influence the understanding of health conditions, and Alzheimer’s biomarkers

Health conditions do not exist in a vacuum. You can’t separate a condition from the broader world of cells, tissues, organs, humans, populations, or external factors. Even conveying the scope of a condition can be a perplexing ordeal. We don’t first recognize conditions without understanding how the affected individual is supposedly abnormal compared to a person who does not appear to be affected by any condition.

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The History of Epilepsy

The History of Epilepsy

Epilepsy has been recorded as long ago as 2000 BC and was believed to be an illness inflicted by the gods, or possession of evil spirits. Hippocrates instead attributed the disease, then called the ‘sacred disease’, to a medicinal cause, and laid the groundwork for the world to see epilepsy as a neurological condition worthy of education and support.

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Treatment-resistant depression: How is it different from major depressive disorder (MDD)?

Treatment-resistant depression: How is it different from major depressive disorder (MDD)?

For neuropsychiatric diseases such as depression where there are both physical and mental, visible and invisible, components, the scope of research is wide. This can also be complicated by social and cultural factors that can present unexpected problems in investigating these diseases. In this blog, we’ll be reviewing the pathophysiology, biomarkers, clinical implications, and ongoing research into both traditional and treatment-resistant depression.

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Conditions Diagnosed with EEG

Conditions Diagnosed with EEG

The EEG is used to detect epilepsy in patients, showing irregular brain activity that indicates seizures. However, as the test records electrical activity in the brain, other diagnoses can be made or supported with an EEG.

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“Punch-drunk syndrome” and the history of contact sports and brain damage

“Punch-drunk syndrome” and the history of contact sports and brain damage

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, was previously known as dementia pugilistica or “punch-drunk syndrome” for its association with former boxers demonstrating declining ability, memory loss, and lack of coordination. The hallmark risk factor that separates the syndrome from other tauopathies and dementias is repeated trauma to the head, otherwise known as traumatic brain injuries, or TBIs. It’s this repeated trauma where things become an issue for contact sports.

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