How Long Should an Ambulatory EEG Be?

How Long Should an Ambulatory EEG Be?

The brain is constantly sending and receiving electrical signals. When that signaling gets disrupted, a seizure occurs. Abnormal electrical activity in the brain doesn’t always occur during a routine EEG, especially when the patient only experiences epilepsy waves once every few hours or during certain times of the day.

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Discovering Neurons: Santiago Ramon y Cajal

Discovering Neurons: Santiago Ramon y Cajal

Scientists and historians often credit Santiago Ramón y Cajal with being the father of neuroscience. A Spanish scientist of the late 19th century, Cajal bolstered the groundbreaking claim that the human nervous system was actually made up of individual cells or “neurons.”

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A Recently Proposed Model for Alzheimer’s Potentially Unifies 100 Years of Hypotheses

A Recently Proposed Model for Alzheimer’s Potentially Unifies 100 Years of Hypotheses

A new model, proposed by post-doctoral researcher Dr. Jonathan Rudge, offers a novel, compelling explanation for Alzheimer’s disease: The lipid invasion model. Dr. Rudge’s model takes into account many of the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease, including not only neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques but the presence of lipids and damage to the blood-brain barrier among others, to describe in great detail how risk factors lead to the damage seen in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s.

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Altered Reality: Rare Brain Disorders That Change How You Perceive the World

Altered Reality: Rare Brain Disorders That Change How You Perceive the World

Most of the time, our brains can show us a picture that matches the physical world. Visual illusions remind us that the brain doesn’t always get it right, filling in the gaps with our past experiences and bending the perception of reality to meet our expectations. This offers room for translation errors, genetic missteps, and the opportunity for peculiar side effects in how we experience the world around us.

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